How to Keep Chickens at Home

How to Keep Chickens at Home

From Babylonstoren blog – If you still have not visited why deny yourself?

Free-roaming chickens can often be spotted scratching in the garden and plucking pesky bugs off our farm produce. We have five different types of chicken here at Babylonstoren – Boschvelders and Potch Koekoeks in the garden, as well as the Leghorns, Araucanas and Lohmann Browns that are looked after by farmer Christo. We collect their eggs daily to be served at Babeland the Greenhouse, and there’s always a fresh supply available to purchase at the Farm Shop. They never fail to charm our guests and make up a hard-working part of our farming staff.

Chickens are very easy to keep and play a host of helpful roles in the garden and kitchen: they’re fantastic at ridding your garden of insects and snails, and a small brood of about six chickens can lay enough eggs to feed a family of four to six people. Apart from their usefulness, there is something intrinsically therapeutic about keeping chickens – their determined busyness and gentle companionship make them perfect family pets in even smaller-sized gardens. Chicks take about six months to mature into laying hens, after which they will provide you with a steady supply of eggs and delightful company in the garden.

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This post curated for you interest
by Chas Everitt 

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Whether you’re after a windswept coastal wander, a mountainous hike with spectacular views, or a leisurely amble through one of the Cape’s lush nature reserves, here’s our pick of the best hiking trails in and around the city. So, lace up your hiking boots and get cracking… And, let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Important note:
Although the Cape is rich in natural beauty, tourists and locals are urged to take necessary precautions when exploring secluded areas, as crimes and accidents do happen.
Those venturing into the Table Mountain National Park should have the following emergency numbers on hand: 086 110 6417/ 107 or 021 480 7700. Criminal incidents should be reported to the nearest police station as soon as able.
We also recommend @safetymountain as a useful resource for hikers. This free safety tracking service allows you to notify local trackers of your contact details, intended route and travel time via WhatsApp. You are then able to provide hourly updates on your progress and to notify trackers when you are safely off the mountain.

It helps to have a map, and for that, SANParks and The Inside Guide recommends Slingsby Maps as an essential resource for hiking enthusiasts. Detailed maps of some of the Cape’s best hiking trails are available, including the Pipe Track, Cape Point and the Cederberg. Contact Slingsby Maps at 021 788 4545 for more information.

Read the full article

Hiking trails in Cape Town
Hiking trails around the Cape

Source:  https://insideguide.co.za/cape-town/hiking-trails/

This post brought to you by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Sports Festival at Sweet Valley Primary

 

Chas Everitt Cape Town South sponsoring 1200 programmes again this year for Sports Festival at Sweet Valley Primary.

Building on a long-standing involvement with Sweet Valley Primary where we have two agents who have and had children at the school so it is no surprise and our great pleasure to sponsor 1200 programmes again this year.   

“It is a Long and happy association with the school and a privilege to be a part of their community and events and I appreciate the opportunity to get involved,” said Cecily Madison, Chas Everitt’s Bergvliet/Meadowridge area specialist.

See you at the Sports Festival at Sweet Valley Primary on Friday afternoon and Saturday morning.

Website

 

Die Oog

Die Oog

PLEASE HELP “Die Oog” In Bergvliet.

Die Oog is doomed with this drought. Please join Friends of Die Oog. Contact the admin ( admin@dieoog.org.za ) and help in any way possible.  This sanctuary was a haven for leopard toads, the Cape Weaver birds amongst plenty more -they are dying, the water is literally on rock bottom.

The thought of topping up Die Oog with water sounds good but we do need to look at in a water scarce situation where we will obtain the water from as well as checking with the Conservation Department of the city.

Die Oog is a conservation area and comprises four distinct but integrated, surviving biodiverse areas.

The dam fills in winter, often to overflowing and the water levels fall in summer. There is a small artificial island that was built of ironstone 100 years ago.

The surrounding grassland contains shrubs and trees that provide habitat for birds. The banks of the dam consist of reeds and plants that provide valuable cover for water birds. The area has paths, benches and viewpoints of the dam and is intended for quiet recreation.

The granite fynbos area is situated on the eastern boundary of Die Oog and has been staked off for conservation.

Please join Friends of Die Oog we are a volunteer group and rely on a membership of R50 per annum to help maintain Die Oog.

If you are interested in joining Friends of Die Oog please email admin@dieoog.org.za

Let’s save “Die Oog”!

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

From the City of Cape Town.

18 JANUARY 2018

STATEMENT BY THE CITY’S EXECUTIVE MAYOR PATRICIA DE LILLE

In summary:

  • Day Zero is now likely
  • 60% of Capetonians won’t save water and we must now force them
  • Punitive tariff to force high users to reduce demand
  • 50 litres per person per day for the next 150 days
  • Drought Charge likely to be scrapped by Council

We have reached a point of no return. Despite our urging for months, 60% of Capetonians are callously using more than 87 litres per day. It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero. At this point we must assume that they will not change their behaviour and that the chance of reaching Day Zero on 21 April 2018 is now very likely.

The people who are still wasting water seem to believe that Day Zero just can’t happen or that the City’s seven augmentation projects – set to produce around 200 million litres per day – will be enough to save us. This is not the case and, while our water augmentation programme will make Cape Town more water resilient in the future, it was never going to be enough to stop Day Zero.

The crisis has reached a new severity, necessitating a series of new emergency measures:

A punitive tariff

We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them. We have listened to the comments of thousands of residents asking for fairness. Council will on Friday be voting on a punitive tariff that will charge residents exponentially higher rates for water usage above 6 000 litres per month.

The table below outlines the difference between the current and the proposed punitive tariffs:

Consumption per month Current Tariffs – total household water bill New Tariff – total household water bill
6 000 litres

 

R28.44 R145.98
10 500 litres R109.50 R390.82
20 000 litres

 

R361.06 R1 536.28
35 000 litres

 

R1 050.04 R6 939.57
50 000 litres

 

R2 888.81 R20 619.57

I will personally fight to ensure that the proposed punitive tariff exempts those who are using less than 6 000 litres per month.

Provision will be made for households larger than four people to ensure that they are not unfairly penalised. We ask residents to contact the City beforehand on water@capetown.gov.za or enquire at their nearest walk-in centre.

The proposed Drought Charge is likely to be dropped after a massive outcry from Capetonians that it was unfair. I understand that response and it has personally been a tough lesson for the City. I just want you to know that the City proposed the charge because we wanted to keep delivering important and essential services during this crisis. I wanted to continue making Cape Town a city that delivers opportunities for all. We are now going to have to make deep cuts to important projects.

50 litres per day for 150 days

We will be moving to level 6B restrictions with a new limit of 50 litres per person per day to make up for the many months of missing the 500 million litre per day collective consumption target. The new restrictions will come into effect on 1 February 2018.

The new daily collective consumption target is now 450 million litres per day. This will be in place for 150 days after which the City will reassess the situation.

Level 6B restrictions will also limit irrigation using boreholes and wellpoints.

Advanced Day Zero preparation

The City has also advanced its planning for Day Zero with approximately 200 sites having been assessed. The City will be announcing everyone’s local collection points from next week so that communities can begin preparing for that eventuality.

We will also be making detailed Day Zero contingency plans available soon to answer all questions that residents and businesses might have.

In terms of the City’s work, we have been working hard to reduce demand through advanced pressure management, massively ramping up the installation of water management devices at high consumption households.  Our teams are also significantly intensifying the leak detection and repair programme, and we are rolling out education and awareness campaigns and extending our use of the treated effluent system which offsets the use of the drinking water for non-potable purposes.

Teams are working around the clock to deliver the emergency plan for desalination, groundwater and water reuse. But, as I have already said, this alone will simply not be enough to avoid Day Zero without savings from all residents.

Cape Town, this is the moment where we can bring about the fundamental behaviour change that is needed to save us all from running out of water.

The time to act for everyone’s sake is now.

So if we reduce the demand enough now, we can still get our water delivered to our houses and not have to queue daily for our allocation.

For more information

This post was sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Hope in Motion Walk4Wheels

Hope in Motion Walk4Wheels

Join us for a 3km funwalk or a 5km trail run on Dreyersdal Farm, Bergvliet on Saturday, 02 December as we celebrate International Day of Persons with Disabilities.
Put on comfy shoes, make sure you have sun block and support the Chaeli Cottage Preschool & Enrichment Centre.

Breakfast rolls (Bacon & Egg OR Cheese & Egg), tea/coffee and soft drinks will be sold after the race!

Tickets are R60 for Adults and R40 for children (under 12 years) and can be purchased through Quicket.

As the event is taking place on a farm you will not be able to bring your furbabies this year.

Contact Person: Shelly Stedman
Email Address: shelly@chaelicampaign.co.za
Telephone Number: 021 762 3835

Starts:
Sat 02 Dec 2017 at 8:00 AM 
Ends:
Sat 02 Dec 2017 at 11:00 AM

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

No More Bare Feet – Uphawu

No More Bare Feet – Uphawu

What it is?
“No More Bare Feet” was established in 2016 by Mondeka Mabibini, as the second leg of the Uphawu Community
Development organisation, of which she is the founder.

What’s our Aim?

The aim of the No More Bare Feet campaign is to give children in the rural areas of the Eastern Cape, where she comes from, shoes to wear to school. Many children are from poor backgrounds and their parents cannot afford to buy school shoes for them. Here poverty is dire and children have to walk up to 10km or more kilometres a day in order to get to and from school.

STBB’s involvement
With the support of national law firm STBB I Smith Tabata Buchanan Boyes, the campaign is now in its third year. All
shoes collected are distributed during the first two weeks of the school term to the schools. The vision is to motivate
or lift up the school children’s dignity and self-esteem.

How your donation helps
By donating a pair of shoes today, you:
• Make a difference to a child who walks to school barefoot over rough terrain, winter and summer;
• Instill self-esteem and confidence in the learners;
• Help build the learner’s dignity.

To those who are able to assist in this very worthy cause, either with a new pair of shoes or used shoes of any size, please drop off at any of our Chas Everitt Offices.

Locations:  Tokai, Bergvliet, Claremont and Fish Hoek before the 8 December 2017

Makes a huge difference to these kids’ lives as also to their parents and any contribution will be appreciated.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Community Imbizo

Community Imbizo

This event is hosted by the Diep River Community Policing Forum where we will be commemorating the start of the 16 days of Activism for gender and domestic abuse. There will be activities throughout the day and food stalls as well as organisations that deal with abuse to let the community know there are places available that can help.

Support the local community security providers as well as neighbourhood watches by buying some food from the stalls. As it is the start of the 16 days of activism, there will be companies and government departments also taking part advertising their services for the public. There will be entertainment throughout the event, snake show, fire safety display, marimba band, drumming and lots more… Please come support the Diep River CPF and SAPS.

Date: 25 November 2017

Time: 9:00–14:00

More Information

 

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

From: City of Cape Town – 13 November 2017

Dam storage levels are at 36.8%, with useable water at 26.8%. Collective water usage is 582 million litres, therefore 82 million litres above the required level of 500 million litres per day.

Our dam levels have declined by 1% over the past week. This could be attributed to the high winds and hot weather which contributed to evaporation. We have managed to halve Cape Town’s water usage with the help of 51% of our water users who have put tremendous efforts into saving water. We will only get through this crisis together. To make this partnership work even more effectively, I appeal to all water users, especially the 49% who are not saving water yet, to join us all as we escalate efforts to beat this drought. Your help is vital and we need you to come on board with Team Cape Town.

This summer with the heat and wind, we can expect a steady decline going forward, so continued savings are a must. We need to do more to bring our usage down while at the same time pulling out all of the stops to ensure that we implement various projects for additional water supply to help see us through to winter 2018. Additional supply goes hand in hand with further savings.

We have looked at ways to fund a first phase of water supply projects by relooking at our spend across the City to see which non-water-related projects we can temporarily postpone while protecting funds for basic and emergency services. Internally, we have made some tough decisions and we will continue to do what is in the best interests of the people of Cape Town, no matter how difficult the challenge. We will partly be funding our first seven additional water projects with this saving and reprioritised money which comprises some R2 billion. The first phase projects earmarked for these funds are the desalination plants at Monwabisi, Strandfontein, the V&A Waterfront, and Cape Town Harbour; the Atlantis and Cape Flats Aquifer projects; and the Zandvliet water recycling project make up the first seven emergency water projects of this phase.

An online toolkit has been developed with various resources for all to use to help us to drive this message. Please see our website, www.capetown.gov.za, to access material that you may require. This toolkit will be updated regularly.

For information on how to meet the daily water usage requirement, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater and utilise our water calculator: http://bit.ly/ThinkWaterCalculatorCT

Residents can contact the City via email to water@capetown.gov.za for queries about the water pressure reduction, or to report contraventions of the water restrictions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts), or they can send an SMS to 31373.
This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

City commissions project to bring additional drinking water online from springs and Molteno Reservoir

City commissions project to bring additional drinking water online from springs and Molteno Reservoir

From: City of Cape Town

The first water from the Oranjezicht Main Springs Chamber started flowing into the Molteno Reservoir today, 8 November 2017. This is part of the City of Cape Town’s ongoing Water Resilience Programme to increase the supply of drinking water. This project will see an additional two million litres per day of safe, clean drinking water added to the City’s bulk water network.

Three springs feed into the main collection chamber in Oranjezicht, where water is collected before being conveyed via a 525m long existing pipeline to the reservoir. The water is then chlorinated to bring it in line with the South African National Standard for drinking water (SANS 241).

The project entailed refurbishing for drinking water purposes the existing but disused pipeline, which takes the water from natural springs to the Molteno Reservoir. New chlorination equipment to dose the disinfectant along the pipeline linking it to the reservoir itself has also been installed.

When the City started investigating the possibility of using these springs as additional sources of drinking water in 2014, our Scientific Services Branch found that water from some of the springs was of a very high quality.

Previously, this untreated water from the main springs collection chamber was used for irrigation at the Green Point Urban Park, Cape Town Stadium and Green Point Athletics track.

From the commencement of the City’s investigation to this point of commissioning, the cost of this project amounted to around R4,1 million.

The City is committed to doing everything it can to ensure that Cape Town has sufficient drinking water to see us through the upcoming summer months, and beyond.

Last week I also visited the Atlantis Aquifer where refurbishment work by the City’s Water and Sanitation Management Department has increased yield from this source by an additional five million litres a day.

We will continue working on a range of augmentation plans, fast-tracking processes as much as possible to bring alternative sources of drinking water online, including desalination, ground water extraction, and water reuse as we build a water-resilient Cape Town. Together with the great water-saving efforts of residents, we will make it through this unprecedented drought.

This Post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South